Nexus of Change

Toward Sustainable Habits and Durable Prosperity

Reclaim, Remain, and Rebuild

Everybody gains when residents of the poorest neighborhoods in the nation organize themselves to improve their collective fate. Last Saturday, Occupy Our Homes Atlanta (OOHA) and Metro Atlanta Democratic Socialists … Continue reading

April 8, 2014 · 2 Comments

Growing Food for Stronger Communities in Vine City

July 22, 2012 · 1 Comment

Vine City Starts Large-Scale Community-Building Project

Across the disaffected neighborhood of Vine City in Atlanta, land owners are entrusting Occupy Atlanta to exploit lots of land that have been deemed unprofitable. Permaculture projects planned by Occupy … Continue reading

May 20, 2012 · 7 Comments

Permaculture Experts Gather in Vine City for Community-Building

Sally Mason and Anna Kelley from Occupy Atlanta invited long time activist Kwabena Nkromo to host a conversation about food democracy in Vine City. Kwabena’s involvementĀ in creating community gardens dated … Continue reading

April 22, 2012 · 4 Comments

American Spring in Vine City

We are now seeing in the United States political movements from the entire range of the political spectrum rally against a common enemy. With stunning rapidity, legislators throughout the country … Continue reading

March 26, 2012 · 4 Comments

Occupy Atlanta Saves Historic Church From Foreclosure

The Higher Ground Empowerment Center also known as Mount Gilead Missionary Baptist Church has been in Atlanta’s Vine City neighborhood for 108 years. Despites its reputation for the help it … Continue reading

January 14, 2012 · Leave a comment

Flickr Photos

WEALTH PRESERVATION AND URBAN REVITALIZATION

Streets of Atlanta is a new photo blog promoting the potential of our neighborhoods for urban revitalization and strong local markets.
 
The Durham Shooting Club was created to celebrate Durham's strong architectural bones and the pride its inhabitants exhibit for their community.

Did You Know That

Since 1995, just 10 percent of subsidized American farms -- the largest and wealthiest operations -- have raked in 74 percent of all subsidy payments. Yet, only a tiny fraction of the farm bill funding goes to programs that support healthy fruits and vegetables.