Nexus of Change

Toward Sustainable Habits and Durable Prosperity

Rooftop Gardens Project in Atlanta

One of the main purposes of creating Nexus of Change over a year ago, was to promote sustainable habits as a way to reconnect to reality and rediscover prosperity.  Fortunately, movements for change are already implementing these practices; and Occupy Atlanta is now cultivating gardens on the roof of a homeless shelter at the corner of Peachtree and Pine. The project was started by the Atlanta Task Force for the Homeless after a structural evaluation was done to ensure that raised gardens beds could be cultivated on the roof of the building.

4 comments on “Rooftop Gardens Project in Atlanta

  1. KB
    December 15, 2011

    This is great, Atlanta has a lot of need of many more of these projects!!

  2. Pingback: https://nexusofchange.wordpress.com/2011/12/11/rooftop-gardens-project-in-atlanta… | Occupy Wall Street Info

  3. plant support system
    January 28, 2013

    Hi there, all is going sound here and ofcourse every
    one is sharing facts, that’s actually good, keep up writing.

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